Category Archives: Vocabulary

Build up your Vocabulary & Collocations

Dear Readers

Greetings,

In this series I would be introducing 10 most powerful and widely used words along with their collocations.

  1. Alacrity  [uhlak-ri-tee] – An eager willingness to do something. Showing promptness. Collocation –  She ​accepted the ​money with alacrity.
    Question of private tuition fees they are moving with remarkable alacrity.
  2. Prosaic [proh-zey-ik] – commonplace or dull; matter-of-fact or unimaginative:a prosaic mind. of or having the character or form of prosethe ordinary form of spoken or written language, rather than of poetry
    The reality, however, is probably more prosaic.

    He ​asked if I’d got my ​black ​eye in a ​fight. I told him the prosaic ​truth that I’d ​banged my ​head on a ​door.

  3. Veracity [vuhras-i-tee]Veracity sounds a lot like voracity. Whereas many know voracity means full of hunger, whether for food or knowledge (the adjective form voracious is more common), few know veracity. Unfortunately, many confuse the two on the test.

    Veracity means truthful. (habitual observance of truth in speech or statement) Veracious, the adjective form of veracity, sounds a lot like voracious. So be careful.

    He was not noted for his veracity.  

    To question the veracity of his account.

  4. Paucity [paw-si-tee] : smallness of quantity; scarcity; scantiness: a country with a paucity of resources. smallness or insufficiency of number; fewness. 
    as long as the female, and this would explain the relative paucity of males.
    It is the paucity of its retail base which is stunting growth.
  5. Maintain : The second definition of this word is to affirm; assert; declareOne can maintain their innocence. A scientist can maintain that a recent finding supports her theory.
  6. Contrite : [kuh n-trahyt, kon-trahyt]   caused by or showing sincere remorse. filled with a sense of guilt and the desire for atonement; penitent: a contrite sinner.
  7. Laconic : [luhkon-ik] – › using very few words to ​express what you ​mean: concise: a laconic reply. While Martha always swooned over the hunky, laconic types in romantic comedies, her boyfriends inevitably were very talkative—and not very hunky
  8. Pugnacious : [puhg-ney-shuh s] Much like a pug dog, which aggressively yaps at anything near it, a person who is pugnacious likes to aggressively argue about everything. Verbally combative is another good way to describe pugnaciousinclined to quarrel or fight readily; quarrelsome; belligerent; combative. He served as a pugnacious and dedicated leader of the opposition.

     

  9. Disparate :  [dis-per-it, dih-spar-] –different in every way: The two ​cultures were so ​utterly disparate that she ​found it hard to ​adapt from one to the other.

    distinct in kind; essentially different; dissimilar: disparate ideas.

  10. Egregious : [ih-gree-juh s, -jee-uh s]extremely ​bad in a way that is very ​noticeable: It was an egregious ​error for a ​statesman to show such ​ignorance.‘Greg’ is the Latin root for flock. At one point, egregious meant standing out of the flock in a positive way. This definition went out of vogue sometime in the 16th century, after which time egregious was used ironically.
    Thus for the last five hundred years, ‘egregious’ meant standing out in a bad way. In sports, an egregious foul would be called on a player who slugged another player (not including hockey, of course).
    The dictator’s abuse of human rights was so egregious that many world leaders asked that he be tried in an international court for genocide.

All the best.

Happy Learning.